In photos: Southerners shut down the Klan

On Saturday, December 3rd, a march was organized by various groups, including Industrial Workers of the world and SURJ (Showing Up For Racial Justice), to protest the KKK's "victory march" in honor of Donald Trump. The intention of the anti-Klan marchers was to directly confront the Klan and deny them access to their intended parade route. By 1 p.m. the group of over 100 protestors had already marched in Pelham, North Carolina and driven from Pelham to Danville, Virginia and back searching for the KKK victory march. The KKK was nowhere to be found. Toward the end of the march, the protestor pictured here yelled to the media, "We shut it down!"

Indeed they did. The Klan fled to Roxboro, North Carolina, about 40 miles away, where they drove a measley 30 vehicles town "shouting 'White power' to no one in particular." They were dwarfed in number by the crowds at large, anti-Klan rallies elsewhere across the state on the same day -- the largest of these being in Raleigh, North Carolina. Those rallies were covered by Barry Yeoman in The American Prospect.

Photographed here is the brave but smaller contingent of marchers who sought to confront the Klan directly, and succeeded in denying them their intended celebration in Pelham.

2016_12_03_kkk_iww_rally-104.jpg

Protestors raised fists in the air as symbols of protest and solidarity as they marched through the streets of Danville, Virginia.

Krista Mounts said the Klan has marched plenty of times in this area, but that she never came down to protest before. She said she was inspired to come out and protest on this Saturday because "this time the KKK is marching in honor of Trump."

As protestors in Danville walked with their fists raised in solidarity, people came out of their homes to look, watch, laugh, and raise their own fists.

A protestor stands with her baseball bat on Main Street, downtown Danville, Virginia, while cop cars sit behind her. Throughout the march through Danville the police followed behind, from the sides, and often in front of the protestors. Chants of, "Who do you protect? Who do you serve?" were aimed at the police. Whenever there seemed to be an increasing number of police cars you could hear cries of, "Pull close!" and, "Who protects us? We protect us!"

Looking back up the hill on Main St. in Danville, three police cars sit under Christmas decorations. At least eight more sheriff and cop cars waited on nearby streets as the protestors disbanded.

Nine media members perch on a hill in Pelham, North Carolina. There were reporters from Vice, AJ+, and more. The press moved alongside the march, hopping, running forwards and backwards to angle for the best shots.